Vimeo

Holocaust v Čechách a na Moravě: Hlasy, na které se nesmí zapomenout / The Holocaust in Bohemia and Moravia: Voices that should not be forgotten,directed by: Monika Horsáková, Klára Řezníčková, Czech Republic 2014.

On the occasion of Holocaust Remembrance Day 2019 Apparatus on its Vimeo Channel presents a documentary film containing a rare interview with Theresienstadt child survivor Věra Andrysíková, telling the story of her participation in the film Theresienstadt discussed widely in contributions to Ghetto Films and their Afterlife, a Special Double Issue of Apparatus. Film, Media and Digital Cultures in Central and Eastern Europe 2-3. http://www.apparatusjournal.net/index.php/apparatus/issue/view/3, edited by Natascha Drubek

This interview was made in Ostrava in 2014 for the documentary film The Holocaust in Bohemia and Moravia: Voices that should not be forgotten. The film was an initiative of the Czech Union of Freedom Fighters in Ostrava. The film presents the fate of three witnesses – Věra Andrysíková, Luděk Eliáš and Michal Salomonovič who survived the genocide of the Jews during World War II. The survivors recall the first European transport of the Jews to Nisko (district of Lublin), the ghettos of Litzmannstadt and Theresienstadt, the shooting of the propaganda film “The Führer Gave A City o the Jews” [Theresienstadt], Auschwitz concentration camp, forced labour and the bombing of a factory in Dresden.

The script for the film was written by Mikuláš Odehnal and Monika Horsáková, who together with Klára Řezníčková also directed the film. Tomáš Hoffmann and Pavel Borovička stood behind the camera, Tomáš Pchálek edited the film, the sound edit came from Jaroslav Zajíček and Viktor Pokorný.

Věra Andrysíková (* 1935) spent 3 years (from her 7th to 10th year) in the Theresienstadt Ghetto. "There were 12 children in the room with their mothers. Dads and older siblings lived and worked elsewhere, and we could were hardly in contact with them. Of these children one older girl and me were the only ones who survived.” Věra Andrysíková took part in the propaganda film Theresienstadt. She escaped the transport to death only because her father had helped to provide a source of drinking water for the ghetto. At the end of the war, her family was included into a transport from Theresienstadt to Switzerland, which, according to Věra Andrysíková, was paid for by Jews from the USA. Věra Andrysíková became a Doctor of Psychology and is also a member of the international Association Terezín Initiative Institute, whose aim was, among other things, to establish the Theresienstadt Memorial in Terezín, which reminds today's generations of the horrors the Nazis committed during the war against innocent people.

Monika Horsáková (* 1970)

Documentary filmmaker, Head of the Department of Audiovisual Production at the Faculty of Philosophy and Science of the Silesian University in Opava, Czech Republic. With director Petr Lokaj she has made Holocaust Deniers (Popírači holocaustu, 2009) and Extremism Calling (Volání extremismu, 2010) for Czech Television. Over the past seven years, she has been focusing on the creation of educational documents with historical events for teaching history at elementary and secondary schools. With a film crew composed of future filmmakers (Opava film students) she has recorded 37 short documents for Alone Against Evil (Sami proti zlu), History First Hand (Dějiny na vlastní kůži), and Docu-Memories (Doku-vzpomínky). Monika Horsáková has editorially contributed to the publication of the following books: Migrace – historie a současnost (Migration – history and present; Občanské sdružení PANT, Edice Moderní dějiny 2016) and Holokaust a jiné genocidy (The Holocaust and other genocides, editors of the Dutch edition: Barbara Boender and Wichert ten Have). The editors of the Czech edition were Martin Šmok and Monika Horsáková (PANT, Edice Moderní dějiny, 2015); for the Czech edition a chapter on Holodomor in Ukraine was added as well as documentary materials filmed by M. Horsáková and K. Řezníčková.

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Video clips from Mikhail Romm's 1965 films in the article “Image Politics. Ordinary Fascism – Contexts of Production and Reception” by Sabine Hänsgen and Wolfgang Beilenhoff. 2016. Ghetto Films and their Afterlife (ed. by Natascha Drubek). Special Double Issue of Apparatus. Film, Media and Digital Cultures in Central and Eastern Europe 2-3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17892/app.2016.0002-3.42

This article is part of our special issue Nr. 2-3 "Ghetto Films and their Afterlife": http://www.apparatusjournal.net/index.php/apparatus/…/view/3

Clip from: Mikhail Romm, Obyknovennyi fashizm, 1965, Stroop album sequence, USSR version. Clip courtesy of Mosfil’m.


 Clip from: Mikhail Romm, Obyknovennyi fashizm, 1965, Wehrmacht photographs sequence, USSR version. Clip courtesy of Mosfil’m.


 Clip from: Mikhail Romm, Obyknovennyi fashizm, 1965, the eye-sequence, USSR version. Clip courtesy of Mosfil’m.


 Clip from: Mikhail Romm, Obyknovennyi fashizm, 1965, beginning of Chapter VIII, USSR version. Clip courtesy of Mosfil’m.


 Clip from: Mikhail Romm, Obyknovennyi fashizm, 1965, beginning of Chapter VIII, GDR version. Clip courtesy of. Mosfil’m / DEFA.


 Clip from: Mikhail Romm, Obyknovennyi fashizm, 1965, beginning of Chapter VIII, FRG version. Clip courtesy of Mosfil’m / Atlas Film.


 Clip from: Mikhail Romm, Obyknovennyi fashizm, 1965, opening sequence for USSR version. Clip courtesy of Mosfil’m.


 Clip from: Mikhail Romm, Obyknovennyi fashizm, 1965, opening sequence for GDR version. Clip courtesy of Mosfil’m / DEFA.


Clip from: for Mikhail Romm, Obyknovennyi fashizm, 1965, opening sequence for FRG version. Clip courtesy of Mosfil’m / Atlas Film.